The colorful wolf

February 14, 2011

Freedom (anime)

Filed under: japan — randy @ 13:02
Tags: ,

I watched this anime called Freedom recently. It’s beyond visually stunning, as you can see from the intro.

The story was decent, the execution a bit less, but all in all it was very entertaining. The creators really did go out of their way to go from a situation of no freedom at all to a situation of total freedom, which is brilliant. It’s only 7 episodes, go watch it in HD.

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February 3, 2011

The Best Anime

Filed under: japan — randy @ 20:22

Found this picture online somewhere. I could not possibly agree more with this image. If you’re ever going to watch anime, pick something from this list. You won’t be disappointed.

The Best

January 14, 2011

電話で日本語

Filed under: japan — randy @ 13:08

日本に出てからもう9月がたった。どのぐらい私の日本語が下手になったのか、昨日見出した。電話で三菱UFJ銀行と話した。

VOIPを使って話したが、音声のクオリティが悪くて同じことを何回いっても通じなかった。向こうの日本語はちょっと分かりにくくて悔しかった。結局は同じせりふを何度も繰り返して長い会話になった。結果はよくないけど。私が電話した理由はカードの問題で、海外からは解決できないらしい。残念。

ちなみに、私は日本語能力試験を行うつもりだけど、昨日の会話から分かった事は、たくさんの勉強が必要だ。でも、ヨーロッパで日本語を勉強する人は皆オタク。。もうヨーロッパのオタクになったよ!練習しなければなりません!

January 4, 2011

いきなり日本語かよ

Filed under: Daily Life,japan — randy @ 16:59

諸君共、ご無沙汰しております。術はこれが私の初めての日本語のブログ。もう9ヶ月たったので全部忘れました。今年の夏はJLPT/日本語能力試験を行うつもりなので、よくないこと。

私は先月やっとロンドンに引っ越した。仕事を見つかることは大変だった。でも出来た。今は一時的なアパートに住んで、土曜日はまた引っ越す。来週からはロンドン人になるはずだ。

私が働いている会社がとても面白い。ソフトウェア開発の先輩たちは皆私より優秀。たくさん勉強できると思う。今までは技術的に面白くて私が出来るレベル。でも、開発のやり方はまだ慣れてない。ペアープログラミングと言うやり方はいつも二人で一つの問題を解決すること。なかなか頭が休憩出来る時間を与えなかった。少しストレス。

ロンドンは(当然)日本と違う。生活、人々、文化、ぜんぶ違う。私が生まれたオランダと似ている。いつもオランダから逃げている私にとっては、それはどう感じればいいのかが分からない。最初からはずいぶん別だと思ったけど、実は似ている。やっぱ日本が懐かしい!

明け増してお目で問う。 

笑。

November 22, 2010

Good morning!

Filed under: Daily Life,japan — randy @ 15:57

This photo was taken almost 3 years ago in Kyushu, Japan. Our first day ever on a cycling trip, and the first day ‘in the wild’ of Japan. To make a long story short, we ended up pitching our tents on top of a hill in front of some hotel rooms, with the owner’s permission. What a great view to wake up to.

So why the sudden reminiscence? Well, I did in fact gather up enough courage to go running today, and my mind was warped. It’s as if I had been thinking at 10% capacity for the past few weeks, and now I’ve suddenly found my wits back. I remembered stuff that I had long forgotten, and I thought up some nice solutions for the website project that I’ve been working on. Let that be a lesson to all of us techies: exercise builds inspiration!

 

October 24, 2010

Do I hate Japan?

Filed under: japan,Thoughts — randy @ 1:58
Tags: ,

A while back I received an e-mail from a Japanese person, telling me how much he disliked Japan. His perspective was an interesting counterpoint to my own, and I blogged about what I liked about being in Japan. Yesterday I received another e-mail from the person I’ll refer to as T.

Do I hate Japan?
The answer to the title is obviously a yes for me. I think Japan is not
fun. This is the biggest problem. I used to live in America for 6 years. I
thought it was heaven there. I  wouldn’t have had a problem living there
for the rest of my life. Actually I wanted that.
School is not fun at all. When I lived in America, my place always had
dance parties like every month. Now if we have this every month, school
would be a little better. And you would be able to work hard for that day.
There is no goal here to make students work harder.
Another one is that kids in Japan play games too much. I think one reason
to that is Japan doesn’t have a backyard big enough to play outside. And
even if we have parks there usually small and full of sand not grass. I
think the environment is too different. People can’t make big backyards
because Japan is too crammed and there is no space to make such place. Not
just that. If you want a big backyard it would cost you a lot.  How do you
think about it so far? Boring? That’s what I would think. Japan is a
place that would be fun visiting but it’s not good to live here. The only
good thing in Japan is probably the technology. (Which these days there
not the best anymore.)
In Japan everything is too strict. Maybe that’s another reason why Japan
is not fun. We can’t get license when were sixteen. And wherever we go
there’s something like a time limit set by parents. Maybe that’s not
just Japan but still we don’t have much freedom as we do in America. In
America I felt free.
After writing this essay I realized how much I hate Japan again

Imagine that you’re suddenly spending six years in a foreign country that does things very differently from your own, and you like it. Then you have to go back to where you came from, but suddenly everything seems different. You can’t appreciate things in the same way that you could before living in a foreign country. I think a lot of ex-pats will recognize this feeling.

While reading the e-mail I was already preparing myself to defend Japan against whatever arguments he would offer, but I gradually realized that our situations are just too different. I think a lot of the points mentioned by T are in fact very valid. Children would have a very different childhood in the US compared to Japan. I’ve heard a lot of expats in Japan complain about the education in Japan not being up to modern standards. I’ve never had children in Japan myself so I can’t really comment about the practicalities. If anyone was in such a situation, feel free to reply.

Thinking back to my own childhood, we did have a huge backyard. I did have a lot of freedom when I was young. But I would definitely not say that my education was fun. It did have its highs and its lows, but on average it was pretty boring. I got my first dose of true freedom in Japan, which is why I have a very positive image of it. As a foreigner I did not have to try to fit in because I would always be an outsider. Society did not impose high standards on me the way it did on Japanese people.

So really, the issue T has with Japan is understandable. The US and Japan are two very different cultures, and being raised in either one of them will form you as a person, in a very specific way. I think everyone who has ever spent time as an expat in a foreign country can appreciate the experience of being able to see the world from a different perspective. After seeing that life can indeed be lived in a different way, we each draw our own conclusions about how this will affect us. For some, like T and myself, it means that it’s become harder to appreciate the country we were born in. What does it mean to you?

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